IMPACT REPORT
2015/2016

MISSION

Youth Without Shelter is an emergency residence and referral agency serving homeless youth. We are dedicated to providing shelter and support programs for homeless youth, ages 16-24. We provide an independent shelter, committed to diverse, client-focused services, in a safe and non-judgmental environment. Our programs enable youth to live responsibly and independently in society.

Vision: Ending homelessness…one youth at a time, one step at a time.

Values: Accountability, client-focused, collaboration, communication, creativity, excellence, diversity, integrity, respect.

Resilience-Based Case Management: Youth Without Shelter practices resilience-based case management which identifies and builds on the strengths of each youth. For most it may be the first time an authority figure has recognized their abilities and indicated belief in their capability to achieve success. This greatly improves the youth’s self-esteem and builds the confidence needed to achieve their goals.

Trauma-Informed Care: “Everyone has the right to a future that is not dictated by their past.” Youth Without Shelter provides trauma-informed care as a core principle of operations. For service providers to become effective with individuals in their care, there has to be “needs based” planning, not only at a client level but at a program and system level as well. The majority of the youth YWS serves have had to deal with overwhelming personal experiences that may have changed their perception about life. Our goal is to have a support system that will empower young people to succeed, and help them transition from a post-traumatic state to post-traumatic growth.

Board of Directors: CHAIR Moez Bawania, VICE CHAIR and TREASURER Nick Viris, SECRETARY Mohamedali Dharamshi DIRECTORS Janet Bray, Parveen Dhupar, Halinka Dybka, Talya Gaborieau, Fariyal Hasham, Tracey Irwin, Abbas Kassam, Dave Mathews, Tony Small

Advisory board: Dan Shea, David Mielke

MANAGEMENT LETTERS

Traumatized yet resilient, struggling yet persevering. These are a few words that describe the extraordinary youth the Youth Without Shelter (YWS) Team is honoured to empower every day to overcome homelessness. It is you, the YWS community of committed partners, volunteers, and donors that make it possible for YWS to develop personalized strategies that successfully transition youth to independence. Thank you for contributing and collaborating in so many ways to meet our vision of ending homelessness…one youth at a time, one step at a time.

This year a comprehensive strategic planning process was undertaken by the YWS Team and Board of Directors. After consulting, listening, and learning from our stakeholders, the YWS Staff Team, and the youth we serve, we have embarked upon a three-year plan with four strategic priorities: people and culture; preventing youth homelessness; funding the possibilities; and looking to the future. Each of these priorities builds for the future upon the firm foundation of a compassionate and effective team, as well as our core practices of resiliency and trauma-informed models of care, and an unwavering belief in the potential of young people challenged with homelessness.

This year, YWS responded to increasing pressure to provide safe shelter for youth in Toronto with the addition of three beds in our emergency residence. YWS now offers refuge and essential services to 53 youth on any given night.

After twelve years of having the privilege of being this extraordinary organization’s Executive Director, I retired in April 2016. I have had the opportunity to work together with our new Executive Director, Nilda Patey, for 4 weeks to ensure a smooth transition. She shares our commitment to craft change in the lives of the remarkable young people we care for. Using the new strategic plan as a guide, Nilda, the YWS Staff Team and Board of Directors are determined to innovate, finding new unlimited possibilities for homeless youth.

On a personal note, I would like to say that it has been an honour to work with our youth and watch them grow and flourish. There are so many young faces I will never forget.

Our incredible staff team, volunteers, board of directors, partners, and dedicated financial supporters are second to none. It has been a pleasure working with you towards our common mission. I sincerely thank you all for your dedication, support and highly valued friendship.

Wendy Horton
Executive Director
2015/16

I’m joining YWS at a pivotal time. We’re at the peak of transformation; of our system of care, of the organization, and of the individuals we support.

I believe every member of the YWS team is a catalyst for positive change. Rarely does a single experience or event result in homelessness. Every young person is unique and has their own differing needs and complex challenges they face. Our role is to provide pathways out of homelessness. It’s time to shift upstream to prevention, education, and community capacity building. We will work to fortify existing collaborations and partnerships, strengthen our service delivery practice, trauma-informed care and our resiliency-based framework. We will build on competencies and share responsibility for successful results. All young people are entitled to dignity, autonomy and self-determination. We believe in the saying, “nothing about me, without me.” That’s why youth are at the centre of their own plans to transition from the streets to the shelter, and eventually to forever homes. We are their quarterbacks to support them.

The recent addition of “strive for greatness” graffiti art on the outside wall of the facility speaks volumes. As a system our focus has to be to create an integrated approach to care. We have to find ways to create meaningful engagement with all stakeholders, such as early identification, intervention and prevention, and providing equitable access and responsive care. It is a focus that must extend beyond the walls of our building through the continued enhancement of after-care for youth to support stable independent living.

The definition of “greatness” is unique for each individual. Resiliency is the determination to strive and continue to evolve with new experiences and overcome challenges of life.

Nilda Patey
Executive Director
2016

FROM THE CHAIR AND YWS BOARD OF DIRECTORS

After 12 years of service to Youth Without Shelter, our Executive Director, Wendy Horton retired on May 6, 2016. Wendy’s impact on the organization, youth, and programs has been significant. Under her leadership Youth Without Shelter underwent a $2.8 million facility expansion, adding several meaningful programs that provide wraparound services to empower youth. This included the launch of the innovative Stay in School Program, development of an on-site Employment Program, and the reconfiguration of the case management model. The number of available beds at YWS grew from 30 to 53. Wendy introduced the Strength-based Resiliency Model of Care to YWS. It is now a core operating principle at YWS that focuses on young people’s strengths, builds a safe community within our walls, and fosters a relationship based upon trust and respect. Her passion for the youth, her professionalism, and her outstanding service will be remembered and is greatly appreciated.
On April 18, 2016 Youth Without Shelter welcomed Nilda Patey as our new Executive Director. For more than 19 years, Nilda has held various leadership positions within the health and human services sector working with a variety of organizations such as; John Howard Society of Peel, United Way of Peel, Knights Table, and most recently, Bethell Hospice. She has led organizations through periods of substantial growth and transition, and developed and implemented innovative programs and services. The YWS Board of Directors is excited to work with Nilda to further advance the goals of the organization. Next time you are at YWS volunteering, donating or visiting, we invite you to introduce yourself to Nilda to share why you are involved with YWS and tell her your YWS stories!

Moez Bawania
Chair of the Board
2015/16

Strategic Plan Accomplishments 2015/16
PEOPLE AND CULTURE:

Succession plans established for primary leadership roles.

Resiliency model of care training completed by entire YWS team, both full-time and part-time. Informative overview provided to the board of directors. Two team members fully trained to provide future resiliency training. Culture of resiliency reinforced ensuring every youth has the support to develop to their potential.

New office space created for the employment program through build-out of storage space.

Executive Director search completed with new executive director in place.

FUNDING THE
POSSIBILITIES:

Corporate partnership program formalized and introduced.

Strategic Plan Priorities 2016/17
PEOPLE AND CULTURE:

Transition and integration of new executive director.

Furnish and equip new office space for employment program.

Enable a high-performing Board of Directors through the establishment of a board development committee.

Develop a well-trained, compassionate and effective team through participation in additional training opportunities, specifically surrounding Trauma Informed Care.

PREVENTING YOUTH
HOMELESSNESS:

Expand aftercare support to facilitate successful independent living through the addition of a new housing outreach worker.

Implement a preventative strategy that educates youth and the broader community about the issue of youth homelessness.

Add an educational outreach facilitator role.

FUNDING THE
POSSIBILITIES:

Development of a long-term funding plan (up to 5 years).

Each youth’s journey out of homelessness at YWS is a personal path of empowerment. Follow Brit’s and Annie’s stories to see how youth work one-on-one with the YWS Team to break out of the cycle of abuse, neglect, and poverty in a safe and planned manner.

BRIT’S STORY:
1

“In my country at 19 years of age I had come to fear for my life. I was targeted for persecution and discrimination for my sexual orientation. The police began to seek me out and I realized that I had no protection. That they intended to hurt me. My parents were deceased."

PATH INTO HOMELESSNESS
A recent survey of homeless youth in Canada shows 22.3% were born outside of Canada

2

“I was becoming depressed, not knowing whom to trust. I am a high school graduate and was working as a cosmetician. It was my community of friends and church members who said to me you need to leave this country for your own safety or the police are going to kill you. Without the community fundraising efforts I never could have afforded an airplane ticket. My dream was to take refuge in a country where I could find safety, give back and reach for more education. That is how I came to be in Canada.”

HOW YWS EMPOWERS
Brit was sheltered in YWS’s Emergency Residential Program: Our 33 bed residential program meets the needs of diverse youth who have chosen to leave or are forced to leave because of unsafe, abusive, and/or neglectful living situations. In a comfortable and safe environment youth have access to crisis counselling, nutritious food, clothing and hygiene products.

Emergency residential program impact by the numbers for 2015-16:
11,134 safe bed nights
42,305 nutritious meals/snacks
1,781 youth goals completed
2,273 case management meetings

3

“At first I stayed with a family I was referred to from friends back home. But I felt unsafe there. They were abusive in many ways. It was through word of mouth that I heard about Youth Without Shelter.

PATH INTO HOMELESSNESS
Up to 20% of youth residing at YWS identify as LGBTQ2S. 1 in 5 youth in the Toronto shelter system identify as LGBTQ2S

4

“It’s not been easy to share my story with strangers but I’ve found comfort in talking to Emme, my Case Manager. We’ve done a lot of talking and out of that has come a plan: I’m making a Refugee Claim to remain in Canada.”

HOW YWS EMPOWERS
The YWS Steps to Success Program facilitates the development of life skills through a range of workshops presented by both staff as well as over 12 partner agencies. Recreational activities are also provided to develop social skills and ease stressors.

Steps to Success Program impact by the numbers for 2015-16:
442 workshop sessions
2,283 participants

5

“There is so much to learn and I’m scared. Emme is helping me step by step ― and there are many steps. So far she’s connected me with a Legal Aid Lawyer, helped me to register for school to upgrade my language skills, and introduced me to other groups both inside and outside the shelter who also will be assisting me as I work towards my claim.”

PATH INTO HOMELESSNESS
Over 90% of homeless youth have experienced abuse and poverty.

6

“Most of all Emme explains everything to me so that I can understand and make my own decisions. For the first time I am beginning to feel safe. My dream is to stay in Canada and become a registered nurse, I love helping babies and older people. Thank you for keeping me safe.”

HOW YWS EMPOWERS
Emme, a Primary Case Manager, says: “As a Primary Case Manager at YWS my main goal is to advocate for my clients, foster resiliency and empower each youth to achieve economic stability and independence. My job is difficult in nature but I love what I do. I am person-centred, advocating for the most vulnerable in our community. I always focus on the goal at hand which is getting youth the support they need. My approach with each youth is respectful and compassionate.”

ANNIE’S STORY:
1

“The feeling of not wanting to go home hurts more than not having a home to go to. It was Valentine’s Day. My dad said he had enough and didn’t want me there anymore.”

PATH INTO HOMELESSNESS
Youth make up 20% of the Canadian homeless population and among the fastest growing segment of this population. On any given night approximately 2,000 youth are homeless in Toronto.

2

“I packed up myself and left. I went back to school and told them what had happened. They told me a bed was available in the Stay in School Program at Youth Without Shelter. And my journey to a shelter began.”

HOW YWS EMPOWERS
YWS’s 20 bed Stay in School Program addresses the many barriers homeless youth face in finishing their education. Tutoring, computer access, school supplies, transit fare, and most importantly, counselling and encouragement are available on an ongoing basis.

Stay in School Program impactby the numbers 2015-16:
15 school graduations
9 family reunifications
100% of Stay in School Program youth felt supported by a case manager
7,082 safe bed nights

3

“I believe you need to stick to what you want. I want school. I want to stay in school for my career. I have an apprenticeship already set-up through the employment program. I like fixing things. My goal is to be a trucking coach technician.”

PATH INTO HOMELESSNESS
Drop out rates in Rexdale are 24%— double the Toronto average.

HOW YWS EMPOWERS
The YWS Employment Program provides dedicated counselling for employment assessment, as well as job searching skills, resume writing, interview skill development, connections to career shadowing, and volunteer opportunities. It aims to alleviate the obstacles youth encounter in finding and maintaining employment. Words from the employment facilitator: “Sometimes we sit in silence, and then come up with the solutions together. She’s doing good things, she is graduating, and has a lot of potential for her upcoming apprenticeship. We are all about staying as connected with youth as possible.”

Employment Program impact by the numbers 2015-16:
63 youth employed
612 case management meetings
308 employment supports distributed
12 employment workshops

4

“Now I’m 17 and living on my own, finishing school and working part-time. The YWS Housing Program workers helped me find a place, connected me with furniture, and supplied me with a starter kit of household items. You can find me at Supper Club every two weeks, having dinner and checking in. I’m excited to start my apprenticeship.”

PATH INTO HOMELESSNESS
Toronto is the most expensive place to rent in Canada. Average waiting time for affordable housing in Toronto is 8 years with 82,414 households on the waiting list.

HOW YWS EMPOWERS
Age discrimination and socio-economic status are frequent obstacles youth must overcome to secure housing. YWS Housing workers are the youth’s guides in finding permanent housing. When housing is obtained workers provide them with household goods and referrals for necessary furniture. Aftercare supports including laundry facilities, a bi-weekly Supper Club, food bank access, and counselling sessions assist youth in maintaining independent living.

Housing Program impact by the numbers 2015-16:
68 permanently housed
961 housing counselling sessions
355 Supper Club participants
1,496 former resident stabilizing supports

TOTAL # OF GROUP PROJECTS:
102
“We are all blessed with good health, a happy home and loving family and we just want to be able to share that with the youth. We cook our food with love, serve it with pride, and enjoy watching the youth eat. It is like we are cooking for our own children!”
— The Diwali Group

# OF VOLUNTEER HOURS DONATED:
14,435
Or 601 days or 1.6 years dedicated to changing the course of the lives of young people who face homelessness.

“For anyone who walks through the doors of YWS, may you find comfort within these walls and trust within the staff. Whether it be a few days or months, I hope you find yourself, and find your home. Let YWS be your shelter, your sanctuary, and your home. I hope that you all feel as welcome as I did in my stay Here.”
— Former YWS youth resident

TOTAL # OF VOLUNTEERS:
3,512

“Thanks for all the love you show us and the caring. Even though we don’t have family you make us feel as if we have one. Thank you.”
— YWS youth resident

3,512 individuals volunteered at YWS through the board of directors, fundraising, human resource, and audit committees, painted, gardened, cooked, packaged, assembled, created, organized, tutored, instructed and educated.

“Tangerine is excited to continue to grow with our #BrightWayForward partners at YWS. Our interactions with the staff and most importantly the youth, have been nothing but positive and enriching. While our organization is proud to witness the impact our volunteer hours have made, the impression the youth have made on our staff has been just as much inspirational and rewarding.”
— Tangerine

# OF MEALS DONATED:
228
228 meals shared in the heart of our home, the kitchen.

EDUCATIONAL OUTREACH PROGRAM
YWS’s “One Youth At A Time” program is an interactive workshop, conducted in grades 3-12 in local schools. The program breaks down stereotypes and myths and introduces the students to the realities of youth homelessness. Goals are two-fold: build knowledge, tolerance and empathy while creating awareness of community resources that can support a youth in preventing and responding to family emergencies.

“I learned not to judge people by the way they look and that anyone could be homeless, depending on their circumstances.”
— Grade 9 Student workshop participant

TOTAL # OF WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS:
1,869
“My favourite part was the presenter challenging the students’ stereotypes of homeless youth.”
— Secondary school teacher, host of workshop

TOTAL # OF WORKSHOPS:
37
“I have friends that need Youth Without Shelter.”
— Grade 12 Student workshop participant

of youth participants in workshops indicate they are now aware of resources in their community to assist homeless youth.

of educators found the workshops to be educational, curriculum related, and age-appropriate

“Homeless to fullness” are the words John chooses to describe his stay at Youth Without Shelter. “When you hit rock bottom the only way is up.” Last fall John found himself homeless. A family situation had reached such a stressful point that he felt he had no choice but to leave home.

Each night John would ride the subway until it would shut down and then move to a local fast food restaurant until the morning came. When John needed clean clothes he would wash them at a friend’s house. A youth worker at the breakfast program where John was volunteering told him about Youth Without Shelter.

John quickly focused on accessing the resources available at the shelter and developing his goals for the future. Working with the YWS employment facilitator he was able to continue his participation in an employment program. “The transit fare provided was a life saver.” John’s advice to youth, “YWS has so many supports to offer you. But it is you who must take the steps to make the changes in your life.”

John’s stay at YWS was not a long one. Within weeks he found a place to live through the housing program. Today John is employed full-time in a business doing a little bit of everything: administration, accounting, inventory, and logistics. “I am a product of YWS. Yes I did the actions, but you were there with the supports.”
— John’s Story

FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY

At YWS, we lead in collaboration with a dedicated volunteer board of directors, fundraising, human resource and finance/audit committees to carry out our mission. YWS is strongly committed to the ongoing efficient use of resources and ensuring the long-term financial viability of the shelter given the ever increasing competition for funding. YWS experienced a successful year of fundraising with several significant unforeseen donations. In response, the board of directors used these unplanned funds to enhance our established Contingency and Capital Reserves and to establish a Long-Term Development Fund. Highlights of these commitments include:

In 2012-13 and in 2015-16 the Board of Directors enhanced the established Contingency and Capital Reserves. The Contingency Reserve ensures the provision of services in the event of a shortfall in contributions or in the event of disaster or any such other emergency. The Capital Reserve is used for future capital replacements, acquisition and renovations and unforeseen working capital requirements. These reserves are critical in ensuring the long term provision of services to youth clients.

In 2015-16, the Board of Directors established a Long-Term Development Fund to be used for a feasibility study and research into possible expansion and other strategic objectives as outlined in the shelter’s strategic plan.

YWS commits your donation with care to enhance the investment in the young people who call Youth Without Shelter home. An estimated 86% of every dollar donated is directed to specialized youth programs and support, with only a 14% cost for administration and fundraising. YWS has a strong social return on investment (SROI). For every $100 gift to YWS more than $900 in social value is created. If you have any additional questions regarding YWS’s financial information or long-term strategic plan, please call our Executive Director at 416-748-0110 ext. 23.

Moez Bawania
Chair of the Board
Nick Viris
Vice Chair and Treasurer

FINANCIAL INFORMATION

The Fiscal 2015-2016 Statement of Financial Position and Statement of Operations included are from the Audited Financial Statements of YWS (auditor: Cowperthwaite Mehta Chartered Accountants). A copy of the entire Audited Financial Statements may be obtained by calling Youth Without Shelter’s Executive Director 416-748-0110 ext. 23 or on our website www.yws.on.ca

To ensure transparency with donors, a minimum of three years of our Annual Impact Reports and Audited Financial Statements are posted on the YWS website along with year over year statistical outcomes in key support programs.

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION AS AT MARCH 31, 2016

The following Statement of Operations reflects the total revenues and expenditures included in the Audited Financial Statements. Note: the expenditures have been recategorized by program function as reported to the City of Toronto annually.

STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 2016

THANK YOU

“You all do such good work! Keep it up. You made me who I am. And I am awesome.”
— Former Youth Resident who stayed at YWS more than 25 years ago and recently reconnected.

To each and every donor, thank you for enabling YWS to be a welcoming place that youth can lean on as they transition out of homelessness.

  • City of Toronto
  • United Way Toronto
  • Ahmet Yazar
  • Andrew Gault
  • April Asplund
  • Bronwen Evans
  • Caroline Holden
  • Caroline Marshall
  • David Lang
  • David Lawson
  • David Mielke
  • David Sutton
  • Debbie Auty
  • Eddie Alkemade
  • Ennis Esmer
  • Geoff Whitlock
  • George Amaral
  • Janet Percival
  • Joseph Gamache
  • Judith Weir
  • Karin Miskovsky
  • Kayvan Mahbod
  • Kevin Mailo
  • Lynn Campbell
  • Lynn Manning
  • Lynne Strathern
  • Michael Reel
  • Michael Reisacher
  • Muzunza Musumbulwa
  • Nadia Sabessar
  • Natasha Rebello
  • Nicola Browne
  • Nicole Craig
  • Rhonda Nemeth
  • Ryan Meghdies
  • Sarah Lerchs
  • Sheila Masters
  • Shums Kassam
  • Simone Lindo
  • William E. Wilson
  • Bangia Family
  • Barker Family
  • Bromstein Family
  • Janssen Inc.
  • Karen Trimble
  • Vallis Family
  • Allan Windows
  • Angus Systems Group Ltd
  • Aramark Canada Ltd.
  • Army Electric
  • Avison Young Real Estate Management Services
  • Bake Sale Inc.
  • Balpex Inc.
  • Brav Media
  • Brightspark Travel
  • Broadridge Financial
  • Solutions Inc.
  • Burgundy Asset
  • Management Ltd.
  • Canadian Scale
  • Company Limited
  • CIBC
  • CIBC Mellon
  • CIBC Securities Inc
  • Community Involvement Team Richmond Hill (Levi Strauss & Co. *Canada Inc.)
  • Crowne Plaza Toronto Airport
  • Da Vinci Banquet Hall
  • Decode
  • DUCA Financial Services Credit Union Ltd.
  • Empire Communities Ltd.
  • File Bank
  • Goodyear Canada Inc.
  • Great-West Life Assurance
  • Guess Canada
  • Health Care Account Co.
  • Hewlett-Packard Enterprise
  • IC Savings
  • Jang Contracting Ltd.
  • Johnson & Johnson Inc.
  • Lika Sports Inc.
  • Manheim Auto Auction
  • McCormack Bourrie
  • Medium Rare
  • Mercedes-Benz Financial Services Canada Corporation
  • Mud Hero
  • Muntwyler Dentistry
  • National Silicates Ltd.
  • Newell Rubbermaid
  • ORBIS Canada Limited, Menasha Corporation
  • Pattison Outdoor
  • Paulcorp Investments Inc.
  • Pizza Pizza Training Centre
  • PwC Canada
  • QBE Services Inc.
  • RBC Royal Bank
  • Samsung Electronics
  • Canada Inc.
  • SAP Canada Inc.
  • Schneider Electric
  • Scotia Bank Public, Corporate & Government Affairs
  • Sears Canada Inc.
  • SICK Ltd.
  • SPC Card
  • Symcor
  • Tangerine
  • TD Bank Financial Group
  • TD Commerical Banking
  • TELUS Corporation
  • Tenacious Satellite Communications Inc.
  • Testing Laboratories of Canada
  • The Home Depot (Rexdale)
  • The Home Depot Canada Inc.
  • The Woodbridge Corporation
  • Treasury Wine Estates
  • UPS Canada Ltd.
  • Vending Products of Canada
  • Whirlpool Canada LP
  • WoodbineEntertainment
  • Group Xpo Logistics
  • Al-Huda Institute
  • Azeez Foundation
  • Bedford Park United Church
  • Beraca Ministries International
  • BLD Covenant Community
  • Bloordale United Church
  • Canadian Islamic Centre
  • Church of God 7th
  • Day Pillar and Ground of Truth
  • Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
  • Faith of Life
  • Fellowship Presbyterian Church
  • Holiness Apostolic
  • Tabernacle Inc.
  • Holy Family Coptic
  • Catholic Church
  • Humber Valley United Church
  • Humber Valley United
  • Church Women
  • Humbervale United
  • Church Women
  • Imdadul Isalmic Centre
  • Islington Evangel Centre
  • Islington United Church
  • Kingsview Village Seventh Day Adventist Church
  • Kingsway-Lambton United Church Outreach Committee
  • Kingsway-Lambton United Church Women
  • Malton Islamic Centre
  • Martin Grove United Church
  • Mount Olive Seventh Day Adventist Church
  • Refuge Temple Church of the First Born
  • Royal York Road United Church
  • St. Benedict Church
  • Out Of Cold Program
  • St. Matthias Anglican Church
  • St. Stephen’s On-The-Hill
  • United Church
  • Taric Islamic Centre
  • Toronto Perth Seventh Day Adventist Church
  • Triumphant Church of Jesus Christ
  • Westway United Church
  • Woodbridge Seventh Day Adventist Church
  • Aston Family Foundation
  • Canadian Online Giving Foundation
  • Charities Aid Foundation Drive
  • CHUM Charitable Foundation
  • Drew Hildebrand Teen
  • Benefit Fund
  • Echo Foundation
  • Geoffrey H. Wood Foundation
  • Intact Foundation
  • J.P. Bickell Foundation
  • Leslois Shaw Foundation
  • Lote Tree Foundation
  • Michael “Pinball” Clemons Foundation
  • Norman Black Foundation
  • Paloma Foundation
  • REALTORS Care Foundation
  • St. Jude’s Project for
  • Homeless Youth
  • The Bedolfe Foundation
  • The C. Dennis Flynn
  • Foundation
  • The Home Depot
  • Canada Foundation
  • The Hustler Young Men’s Bible Class Foundation
  • The W. Garfield Weston Foundation
  • Toronto Foundation
  • Toskan Casale Foundation
  • Trek for Teens Foundation Inc.
  • Winkworth Family Fund at the Community Foundation of Mississauga
  • 219 Scout Troop
  • Earl Haig Secondary School
  • Etobicoke Quilters Guild
  • Humber College
  • I.O.D.E. Kathleen Drope Chapter
  • John D. Parker
  • Elementary School
  • Junior League of Toronto
  • Knights of Columbus Our Lady of Grace Council, 3401
  • Lakeview Lodge #272 I.O.O.F.
  • Markland Wood Golf Club
  • Mechanical Contractors Association Toronto
  • North York Harvest Food Bank
  • Rotary Club of Etobicoke
  • Second Harvest
  • St. Bede Catholic School
  • St. Clement’s School
  • St. George’s Golf
  • and Country Club
  • Teachers Life
  • Insurance Society
  • The Backpacks 101 Project
  • The Optimist Club Of Etobicoke Inc.
  • United Way of Burlington
  • & GreaterHamilton
  • University of Toronto Schools
  • West Humber
  • Collegiate Institute
  • Weston Lions Club
  • William Osler Brampton
  • Civic Hospital
  • Cineplex Entertainment LP
  • Graphic Apparel Inc.
  • Lakeview Lodge #272 I.O.O.F.
  • Mentor College
  • Ogilvy CommonHealth
  • Page Activations
  • Woodbine Entertainment Group
  • A-1 Delivery Service
  • Admill Group
  • AROMA Espresso Bar
  • AURA by Cashew & Clive
  • Big House Pizza
  • Black Press
  • Brunswick News
  • BTI Brand Innovations
  • Burgundy Asset Management
  • Certus Automotive Inc
  • CoastlineCatering
  • Cheese Boutique
  • Crepe Delicious
  • Crowne Plaza Toronto Airport
  • Cummings.Cooper.Schusheim.Berliner LLP
  • Data Media Inc.
  • DUET Public Relations
  • Elements LLP
  • Ernst & Young LLP
  • Executive Caterers of Barrie
  • Glacier Media Group
  • iSource
  • KPMG MSLP
  • Louis Isabella CPA
  • Professional Corporation
  • Medium Rare
  • Mercedes-Benz
  • Financial Services
  • Metroland Media
  • Mill St. Brewery
  • More Than Pies
  • Oaken Financial
  • Oyster Bay Wines (Canada) Limited
  • Pepsico FoodService
  • PDI Integrated Print
  • Solutions Inc.
  • Postmedia
  • Prospect Media Inc.
  • Puh-Nash
  • Quad Graphics Canada
  • Quebecor Media
  • RP Graphics Group
  • SOS Design Inc.
  • Sultan of Samosas
  • Tangerine
  • The Chronicle Herald
  • Thistletown CI
  • Culinary Program
  • Today’s Menu
  • Top Drawer Creative
  • Trade Secret Web Printing
  • UPS Canada
  • Useful Ideas
  • Vibrant Graphics
  • VIBO Restaurant
  • Wishabi Inc.
  • Yamana Gold Inc.
  • Category 5
  • Faren Agency
  • Mantella Corporation
  • Pattison Outdoor Advertising
  • Pattison One Stop
  • Tangerine
  • Cardinal Carter Academy for the Arts
  • Crescent School
  • Downsview Secondary School
  • The Dragon Academy
  • Etobicoke Collegiate Institute
  • Father John Redmond Catholic Secondary School
  • Fieldstone King’s College School
  • George Brown College
  • School of ESL
  • Havergal College
  • Hudson College
  • Kim Okran International Studies Agency
  • Martin Grove Collegiate Institute
  • Monsignor Percy Johnson Catholic Secondary School
  • Sir John A. Macdonald Collegiate Institute
  • St. Mary’s Catholic
  • Secondary School
  • Upper Canada College
  • YMCA Academy
  • The York School
  • Martin was a youth of few words. So it was a surprise when a two-page letter of thanks arrived from Martin addressed to the YWS Team. During his stay at YWS Martin struggled to come to terms with mental health issues. Homeless youth in Canada deal with mental health issues at a rate of 2.5 to 5 times higher than the Canadian average for youth. Martin’s words described his path through YWS to a home to call his own, “I will take the skills and knowledge I learned at YWS to better my future. This was my first shelter and my home for eight months. When I first came to YWS I did not know anybody but the staff and residents welcomed me with open arms. I was not working at the time. The staff helped me out in my time of need.”

    “My mornings at YWS were occupied with the Steps Program. The guests that came into run the workshops were great at teaching me new things that I did not know at the time. I especially liked the substance abuse workshops. I liked helping with cooking when we had cooking workshops, they always made it fun and would make sure I was doing the right thing. Through the housing workshops I learned my rights as a tenant and what I should be searching for in a place of my own. With the employment facilitator I fixed up my resume and applied to the library to help young children read. The staff was always there to listen to what I had to say.”

    “My case workers made sure that I had a meeting with a psychiatrist. They even helped me get the place I am living in right now. I want to thank all the staff for making my stay at YWS a wonderful experience. Keep up the good work.”


    — Martin’s Story

    “It was very difficult for me when I first arrived. I was hopeless. You and YWS made me understand what is called HOPE.”

    — Former YWS youth resident

    our support is their strength. The transition out of homelessness is a unique path for every youth. Your ongoing commitment ensures YWS is there to provide the support and resources to empower each youth to succeed. Your gift can be made on-line at www.yws.on.ca, by cheque or credit card or by exploring a legacy or gift in honour of a special person in your life.

    To discuss how your gift to YWS can build a foundation for the future of every youth who each day “strive for greatness” kindly contact our Development Office at 416.748.0110 ext. 26 or [email protected]